Gefjon and the Giant

Gefjon and the Giant

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Gods

Gefjon (non.)
Gefjon is a goddess in Snorri's Edda but in Heimskringla she is part of the group of people who travel with Óðinn from Asia to the nothern lands. She plays the same role in both sources in tricking King Gylfi of Sweden into giving her a plough share of land which she and her four giant sons, whom she has changed into oxen, drag away to the coast of Denmark.

Sources

Heimskringla (is.)
History of the Kings of Norway (en.)
This account of the history of the kings of Norway and is generally believed to have been written by Snorri Sturluson in Iceland in 1230. It begins with the legendary Swedish dynasty of the Ynglings, who were the subject matter of the skaldic poem Ynglingtal, and ends with the reign of the Norwegian king, Magnus Erlingson (died 1184).
Kongesagaer (1900 ed.) (no.)
The second edition of Gustaf Storm's Norwegian translation of Heimskringla.
Ynglinga saga (is.)
Ynglingesoga (no.)
Saga of the Ynglings (en.)
The first saga in Heimskringla, which is based the nineth-century skaldic poem, Ynglingatal, concerning the legendary Swedish dynasty of the Ynglings.

Creators

Snorri Sturluson (is.)
b. 1179
d. 1241
Nationality: Icelandic
Snorri was an Icelandic statesman, scholar, and author who is credited with writing Heimskringla, The Prose Edda, and possibly Egil's Saga.
Werenskiold, Erik (no.)
b. 1855
d. 1938
Nationality: Norwegian
Werenskiold was a painter and illustrator who was in charge of the illustrations and the team of artists for Gustav Storm's editions of Kongesagaer in 1899 and 1900.