Baldr's Funeral

Editions

  • Den Ældre Eddas Gudesange. Kjøbenhavn: P.G. Philipsens Forlag, 1895. Print.

Secondary Sources

  • Cleasby, Richard and Vigfússon Guðbrandur. An Icelandic-English Dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957. Print.
Gjellerup, Karl (da.)
b. 1857
d. 1919
Nationality: Danish
was a Danish poet and novelist who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1917.
Frølich, Lorenz (da.)
b. 1820
d. 1908
Nationality: Danish
was a painter, illustrator and etcher.
Óðinn (non.)
Odin (en.)
The chief god of the Æsir is The Prose Edda. However, in Heimskringla he is a mortal who tricks the King of Sweden into believing that he is a god.
Baldr (non.)
Balder (en.)
The god who was killed by his brother Höðr.
Þórr (non.)
Thor (en.)
In The Prose Edda he is the son of Óðinn and the giantess Jörð. However, in Heimskringla he is a mortal.
Hyrrokkin (non.)
The giantess who was summoned to push Baldr's funeral ship off of the shore because the gods were not strong enough. She arrived riding on a wolf and using snakes for reigns.
Hyndluljóð The Song of Hyndla This Eddaic poem is not part of the Codex Regius manuscript and is found only in the late 14th century Flateyjarbók manuscript.
EdduKvæði Poetic Edda This collection of eddic poems was compiled by an anonymous scholar in Iceland in the twelfth century. It was for a time mistakenly attributed to a scholar named Sæmundr hinn fróði (1056–1133) and thus was known as Sæmundar Edda.
Den Ældre Eddas Gudesange An edition of the Poetic Edda with illustrations by Lorenz Frølich.
Gungnir (non.)
Óðinn's spear whose name means "swaying one."
Mjöllnir (non.)
Mjollnir (en.)
Þórr's hammer that returns to his hand after he throws it.
úlfr (non.)
wolf (en.)