The Sons of Borr

Editions

  • Den Ældre Eddas Gudesange. Kjøbenhavn: P.G. Philipsens Forlag, 1895. Print.

Secondary Sources

  • Cleasby, Richard and Vigfússon Guðbrandur. An Icelandic-English Dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957. Print.
Gjellerup, Karl (da.)
b. 1857
d. 1919
Nationality: Danish
was a Danish poet and novelist who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1917.
Frrølich, Lorenz (da.)
b. 1820
d. 1908
Nationality: Danish
was a painter, illustrator and etcher.
Óðinn (non.)
Odin (en.)
The chief god of the Æsir is The Prose Edda. However, in Heimskringla he is a mortal who tricks the King of Sweden into believing that he is a god.
Vili (non.)
Vili was one of the three sons of the giant Borr and his wife Bestla. Together with his brothers, Óðinn and Vé, he killed the giant Ymir and created the earth from Ymir's dismembered body.
Vé (non.)
Vé was one of the three sons of the giant Borr and his wife Bestla. Together with his brothers, Óðinn and Vili, he killed the giant Ymir and created the earth from Ymir's dismembered corpse.
Ymir (non.)
Aurgelmir (non.)
Ymir was the primeval being who suckled by the cow Auðhumla. He was the ancestor of the race of giants. He was killed by the sons of Bor, Óðinn, Vili, and Vé, and they created the earth out of his dismembered corpse.
EdduKvæði Poetic Edda This collection of eddic poems was compiled by an anonymous scholar in Iceland in the twelfth century. It was for a time mistakenly attributed to a scholar named Sæmundr hinn fróði (1056–1133) and thus was known as Sæmundar Edda.
Den Ældre Eddas Gudesange An edition of the Poetic Edda with illustrations by Lorenz Frølich.
Völuspá The Prophescy of the Seeress The first poem in the Poetic Edda.
Sons of Borr The three sons of the giant Borr were Óðinn, Vili and Vé. They slew the primordial giant Ymir and created Midgardr from his body.
Creation Myth A series of myths concerning the creation of the world, the origins of the gods, and the creation of humans.