Týr

Primary Sources

  • Reykjavik: Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum. AM 738 4to. 1680. Handcopied paper manuscript.

Secondary Sources

  • Cleasby, Richard and Vigfússon Guðbrandur. An Icelandic-English Dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957. Print.
anonymous
Týr (non.)
Tyr (en.)
The god who put his hand in the mouth of the wolf Fenrir as pledge that the gods were not really trying to bind Fenrir but were only testing his strength. Fenrir bit off Týr's hand when they succeeded in binding him.
AM 738 4to Edda Oblongata This manuscript is known by its shelf mark AM 738. However, it is also known as the Edda Oblongata because because its height is unusually tall compared to its width. It was created circa 1680 by an unknown scribe.
Prose Edda Snorri Sturluson's thirteenth-century prose work concerning Old Norse mythology and poetics.
Binding of Fenrir Myth This myth relates the story of how the gods managed to trick the wolf Fenrir into letting them bind him with a magic fetter. They fail with fetter called Leyding and the one called Dromi but succeed with the one called Gleipnir. Unfortunately, the god Týr had put his hand in Fenrir´s mouth as a guarantee that the gods were not trying to trick Fenrir into being bound. Fenrir bites off Týr´s hand when he realized that he cannot break the fetter.