King Óðinn

Primary Sources

  • Reykjavik: Icelandic National Library. Lbs 1341 8vo. 1700 - 1799 ?. Handcopied paper manuscript.

Secondary Sources

  • Cleasby, Richard and Vigfússon Guðbrandur. An Icelandic-English Dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957. Print.
anonymous
Óðinn (non.)
Odin (en.)
The chief god of the Æsir is The Prose Edda. However, in Heimskringla he is a mortal who tricks the King of Sweden into believing that he is a god.
AM 738 4to Edda Oblongata This manuscript is known by its shelf mark AM 738. However, it is also known as the Edda Oblongata because because its height is unusually tall compared to its width. It was created circa 1680 by an unknown scribe.
Lbs 1341 8vo An eighteenth-century Icelandic paper manuscript containing an illustration of Oðinn.
Huginn (non.)
Huginn is one of Óðinn´s pair of ravens that he sends out in the morning to gather news and whisper it into his ears when they came back. Huginn's name means "thought."
Muninn (non.)
Muninn is one of Óðinn´s pair of ravens that he sends out in the morning to gather news and whisper it into his ears when they came back. Muninn's name means "memory."
hrafn raven
EdduKvæði The Poetic Edda This collection of eddic poems was compiled by an anonymous scholar in Iceland in the twelfth century. It was for a time mistakenly attributed to a scholar named Sæmundr hinn fróði (1056–1133) and thus was known as Sæmundar Edda.